Nathan E. Rogers

Natural History Illustration
Baryonyx walkeriMy version of a strange, piscivorous theropod dinosaur that lived around 130 to 125 million years ago, in the Early Cretaceous of Europe: Baryonyx. A member of the Spinosaurid family, one Baryonyx specimen was found with evidence of fish scales in the area of the stomach, and was also associated with some Iguanodon bones; I’ve portrayed it here as if about to grab the fish Scheenstia, while a lone Iguanodon forages in the distance. Two pterosaurs known as Istiodactylus fly overhead.The Natural History Museum in London produced a great short video about the discovery of Baryonyx, which can be seen here:
http://youtu.be/94jLUmbqyMQ
An excellent skeletal drawing of Baryonyx, by the ever-rigorous Scott Hartman, can be found here:
http://www.skeletaldrawing.com/theropods/baryonyx
I had set myself a personal goal this year of making a new digital painting for each issue of Prehistoric Times Magazine, and this is the final image to complete the series. I’m also hoping to create a new piece of digital music for each new image I make – sort of an ongoing multimedia paleoart project – and the soundtrack for this painting can be found here at my SoundCloud page:https://soundcloud.com/oviraptor-space-program/baryonyx
And a higher res version of the image, here:
http://microcosmicecology.deviantart.com/art/Baryonyx-walkeri-482440269

Please do not reproduce or use without permission, and thanks for viewing (and listening)!

Baryonyx walkeri

My version of a strange, piscivorous theropod dinosaur that lived around 130 to 125 million years ago, in the Early Cretaceous of Europe: Baryonyx. A member of the Spinosaurid family, one Baryonyx specimen was found with evidence of fish scales in the area of the stomach, and was also associated with some Iguanodon bones; I’ve portrayed it here as if about to grab the fish Scheenstia, while a lone Iguanodon forages in the distance. Two pterosaurs known as Istiodactylus fly overhead.

The Natural History Museum in London produced a great short video about the discovery of Baryonyx, which can be seen here:

http://youtu.be/94jLUmbqyMQ

An excellent skeletal drawing of Baryonyx, by the ever-rigorous Scott Hartman, can be found here:

http://www.skeletaldrawing.com/theropods/baryonyx


I had set myself a personal goal this year of making a new digital painting for each issue of Prehistoric Times Magazine, and this is the final image to complete the series. I’m also hoping to create a new piece of digital music for each new image I make – sort of an ongoing multimedia paleoart project – and the soundtrack for this painting can be found here at my SoundCloud page:
https://soundcloud.com/oviraptor-space-program/baryonyx

And a higher res version of the image, here:

http://microcosmicecology.deviantart.com/art/Baryonyx-walkeri-482440269

Please do not reproduce or use without permission, and thanks for viewing (and listening)!

OVIRAPTOR SPACE PROGRAM
Paleoart will always be my first love, but music is so much fun, too: I’ve created the Oviraptor Space Program as a multimedia project with the goal of providing a soundtrack for each new image I make – an ongoing fusion of light and sound, science and science fiction.
Expect a lot of dinosaurs, robots, spacecraft, techy sounds, breakbeats, electro house, and maybe some DnB as the project evolves.
Here’s a link to my first two tracks at my SoundCloud page:
https://soundcloud.com/oviraptor-space-program/sets/launch-first-flight
And a high-res version of the logo:
http://microcosmicecology.deviantart.com/art/Oviraptor-Space-Program-477895956(Please don’t use or reproduce without permission.)
It’s a week later than I hoped to have this all off the ground, but even NASA has launch delays. Fly, little space Oviraptors, fly! Hope you enjoy both the audio and the visual!

OVIRAPTOR SPACE PROGRAM

Paleoart will always be my first love, but music is so much fun, too: I’ve created the Oviraptor Space Program as a multimedia project with the goal of providing a soundtrack for each new image I make – an ongoing fusion of light and sound, science and science fiction.

Expect a lot of dinosaurs, robots, spacecraft, techy sounds, breakbeats, electro house, and maybe some DnB as the project evolves.

Here’s a link to my first two tracks at my SoundCloud page:

https://soundcloud.com/oviraptor-space-program/sets/launch-first-flight

And a high-res version of the logo:

http://microcosmicecology.deviantart.com/art/Oviraptor-Space-Program-477895956

(Please don’t use or reproduce without permission.)

It’s a week later than I hoped to have this all off the ground, but even NASA has launch delays. Fly, little space Oviraptors, fly! 

Hope you enjoy both the audio and the visual!

Diabloceratops eatoni
A centrosaurine ceratopsian from the Wahweap Formation of Utah, this dinosaur was first described in 2010 by James Kirkland and Donald DeBlieux. It lived during the Late Cretaceous (Campanian Age) about 79 million years ago.
Considering that the modern Rocky Mountains were being formed at the time, it seems possible that an unfortunate Diabloceratops might have encountered volcanoes. Volcanic lightning is a real natural phenomenon, and if you haven’t seen photos I highly recommend an image search – it’s amazing.
After the last few calm, quiet scenes I’ve painted, I figured a different tone might be fun, though the results may be straying dangerously close to something one might encounter on the side of a van… in the 1980’s…

Please do not reproduce or use without permission.

Diabloceratops eatoni

A centrosaurine ceratopsian from the Wahweap Formation of Utah, this dinosaur was first described in 2010 by James Kirkland and Donald DeBlieux. It lived during the Late Cretaceous (Campanian Age) about 79 million years ago.

Considering that the modern Rocky Mountains were being formed at the time, it seems possible that an unfortunate Diabloceratops might have encountered volcanoes. Volcanic lightning is a real natural phenomenon, and if you haven’t seen photos I highly recommend an image search – it’s amazing.

After the last few calm, quiet scenes I’ve painted, I figured a different tone might be fun, though the results may be straying dangerously close to something one might encounter on the side of a van… in the 1980’s…

Please do not reproduce or use without permission.

ARCTIC TYRANTMy take on the new tyrannosaurid named Nanuqsaurus hoglundi, from north of the Arctic Circle in Alaska. Smaller than a Tyrannosaurus rex, it may have been covered in feathers. This dinosaur lived during the Late Cretaceous, about 70 to 68 million years ago.
Further information:
http://www.plosone.org/article/info%3Adoi%2F10.1371%2Fjournal.pone.0091287
Please do not reproduce or use without permission.Updates:- I’m aware this was not the dinosaur’s usual habitat - at least not the sort of paleoenvironment in which the fossils were formed - but it is possible that an individual Nanuqsaurus may have wandered into colder, snowier uplands from time to time. Even in the relatively temperate Cretaceous Alaskan winter, there was most likely at least some snowfall.- I posted a higher-resolution version of the image at my DeviantArt page, here (clicking the image enlarges it):http://microcosmicecology.deviantart.com/art/Arctic-Tyrant-Nanuqsaurus-hoglundi-456709272- Prints of this image are now available at my Zazzle page, here:http://www.zazzle.com/aexuron*Thanks for viewing!

ARCTIC TYRANT

My take on the new tyrannosaurid named Nanuqsaurus hoglundi, from north of the Arctic Circle in Alaska. Smaller than a Tyrannosaurus rex, it may have been covered in feathers. This dinosaur lived during the Late Cretaceous, about 70 to 68 million years ago.

Further information:

http://www.plosone.org/article/info%3Adoi%2F10.1371%2Fjournal.pone.0091287


Please do not reproduce or use without permission.


Updates:
- I’m aware this was not the dinosaur’s usual habitat - at least not the sort of paleoenvironment in which the fossils were formed - but it is possible that an individual Nanuqsaurus may have wandered into colder, snowier uplands from time to time. Even in the relatively temperate Cretaceous Alaskan winter, there was most likely at least some snowfall.

- I posted a higher-resolution version of the image at my DeviantArt page, here (clicking the image enlarges it):
http://microcosmicecology.deviantart.com/art/Arctic-Tyrant-Nanuqsaurus-hoglundi-456709272

- Prints of this image are now available at my Zazzle page, here:
http://www.zazzle.com/aexuron*

Thanks for viewing!

Chasmosaurus in the Mountains

Chasmosaurus belli was a ceratopsid dinosaur that roamed the eastern coast of the island continent known as Laramidia about 75 million years ago, during the Late Cretaceous of what is now North America.
Laramidia was separated from the eastern half of North America by the waters of the Western Interior Seaway – the American Midwest was full of fish and giant marine reptiles during the time of Chasmosaurus.
This image is somewhat speculative, as this mountainous terrain is not the type where we know Chasmosaurus could be found, but not outside the realm of possibility, either. Imagine, if you will, a large bull chasmosaur on a dangerous journey westward towards new lands…


Please do not reproduce or use without permission.

Chasmosaurus in the Mountains

Chasmosaurus belli was a ceratopsid dinosaur that roamed the eastern coast of the island continent known as Laramidia about 75 million years ago, during the Late Cretaceous of what is now North America.

Laramidia was separated from the eastern half of North America by the waters of the Western Interior Seaway – the American Midwest was full of fish and giant marine reptiles during the time of Chasmosaurus.

This image is somewhat speculative, as this mountainous terrain is not the type where we know Chasmosaurus could be found, but not outside the realm of possibility, either. Imagine, if you will, a large bull chasmosaur on a dangerous journey westward towards new lands…

Please do not reproduce or use without permission.

The Ovi: An exercise in speculative evolution…I’ve been thinking for a while about what might have arisen if the dinosaurs hadn’t gone extinct, and if selective pressures were such that higher intelligence evolved. There have been some popular works on the subject over the years (the classic and extremely human-like “dinosauroids” of Dale Russell, Robert J. Sawyer’s “Quintaglio Ascension” trilogy of sci-fi books, and many other artists working on similar projects); this one is my take on the idea - sentient Oviraptorosaurs.
It seems most other similar projects tend to speculate on elevated cleverness evolving in the Paraves clade, and this makes sense: We know some of the most intelligent extant organisms on Earth (outside of the primates) are birds, especially the crows and ravens, and certain parrots. Some of their closest extinct non-avian dinosaur relatives are the Dromaeosaurids and Troodontids, and these fine animals are popular points of departure for speculative evolutionists. The Maniraptoran clade (of which Dromaeosaurids, Troodontids, modern birds, and Oviraptorosaurs are all a part) has some key attributes that we share: On Earth we have only one data point for human-level intelligence so far, so it seems logical to me to look for other organisms with similar traits when speculating on potential evolution of advanced tool-using intelligence – traits like large brains, high brain to body size ratios, grasping appendages (useful for manipulating the environment), bipedal motion (to keep those grasping appendages unoccupied), living on land (as smart as dolphins are, it would be hard to use fire, smelt metals etc. underwater), and a social structure that puts selective pressure on the ability to out-think and/or cooperate with others of your species.
Personally, I favored the Oviraptorosaurs in part to differentiate my own fiction from the rest. Oviraptorosaurian brain/body ratio may not have been quite as high as that found in the Troodontids, for example, but they do have one additional interesting trait that is similar to our own hominid forebears: probable omnivory. It seems to me that hominid and corvid intelligence may be at least partly linked to social interaction with conspecifics, but also with problem-solving to exploit different food resources. The Dromaeosaurs and Troodontids, it seems, were more likely obligate carnivores and thus would have less evolutionary pressure to develop interesting techniques for obtaining food. That, and I think Oviraptorosaurs look really cool.
This is a work of fiction; I was thinking of potentially writing and illustrating a book on the subject. If you’d like to see more, leave a comment!

Please do not copy or reproduce without permission.

The Ovi: An exercise in speculative evolution…

I’ve been thinking for a while about what might have arisen if the dinosaurs hadn’t gone extinct, and if selective pressures were such that higher intelligence evolved. There have been some popular works on the subject over the years (the classic and extremely human-like “dinosauroids” of Dale Russell, Robert J. Sawyer’s “Quintaglio Ascension” trilogy of sci-fi books, and many other artists working on similar projects); this one is my take on the idea - sentient Oviraptorosaurs.

It seems most other similar projects tend to speculate on elevated cleverness evolving in the Paraves clade, and this makes sense: We know some of the most intelligent extant organisms on Earth (outside of the primates) are birds, especially the crows and ravens, and certain parrots. Some of their closest extinct non-avian dinosaur relatives are the Dromaeosaurids and Troodontids, and these fine animals are popular points of departure for speculative evolutionists. The Maniraptoran clade (of which Dromaeosaurids, Troodontids, modern birds, and Oviraptorosaurs are all a part) has some key attributes that we share: On Earth we have only one data point for human-level intelligence so far, so it seems logical to me to look for other organisms with similar traits when speculating on potential evolution of advanced tool-using intelligence – traits like large brains, high brain to body size ratios, grasping appendages (useful for manipulating the environment), bipedal motion (to keep those grasping appendages unoccupied), living on land (as smart as dolphins are, it would be hard to use fire, smelt metals etc. underwater), and a social structure that puts selective pressure on the ability to out-think and/or cooperate with others of your species.

Personally, I favored the Oviraptorosaurs in part to differentiate my own fiction from the rest. Oviraptorosaurian brain/body ratio may not have been quite as high as that found in the Troodontids, for example, but they do have one additional interesting trait that is similar to our own hominid forebears: probable omnivory. It seems to me that hominid and corvid intelligence may be at least partly linked to social interaction with conspecifics, but also with problem-solving to exploit different food resources. The Dromaeosaurs and Troodontids, it seems, were more likely obligate carnivores and thus would have less evolutionary pressure to develop interesting techniques for obtaining food. That, and I think Oviraptorosaurs look really cool.

This is a work of fiction; I was thinking of potentially writing and illustrating a book on the subject. If you’d like to see more, leave a comment!

Please do not copy or reproduce without permission.

Dromaeosaurus albertensis
A highlight of my younger years were the occasional pilgrimages to the hallowed halls of our local science museum; the specimens within always fueled my imagination, and one of my favorites was the articulated skeleton of Dromaeosaurus mounted as if perched on a Centrosaurus skull.
Dromaeosaurus was a relative of the more famous Velociraptor, though with a more robust skull. It lived in what is now Canada (including DinosaurProvincialPark in Alberta), and its fossils are found in rocks dating to the Campanian age of the Late Cretaceous, about 75 million years ago. So far the recovered remains have been incomplete, so this rendition is somewhat more speculative than usual, and based on other related species. The dinosaur probably massed comparably to a modern day coyote, though with its large claws and robust jaws it may have been considerably more formidable.
After reading the excellent recent book All Yesterdays (by Conway, Kosemen, Naish and Hartman), I thought it might be good to step away from the typical paleo-art of charging, thrashing, monstrous theropods with mouths agape and roaring, and depict a quieter scene of dromaeosaur daily life.
Some relevant links (speaking of All Yesterdays):
http://johnconway.co/
http://nemo-ramjet.deviantart.com/
http://blogs.scientificamerican.com/tetrapod-zoology/
http://scotthartman.deviantart.com/
If you like Dromaeosaurids, you should definitely also check out Emily Willoughby’s art:
http://ewilloughby.deviantart.com/


Getting better, but I know I have a lot of learning to do, so constructive critiques welcome and appreciated. I may never draw dromaeosaurs again, though – those feathers were a headache. 
I made this using Photoshop CS3 and a Wacom Intuos tablet.
Please do not reproduce without permission.

Dromaeosaurus albertensis

A highlight of my younger years were the occasional pilgrimages to the hallowed halls of our local science museum; the specimens within always fueled my imagination, and one of my favorites was the articulated skeleton of Dromaeosaurus mounted as if perched on a Centrosaurus skull.

Dromaeosaurus was a relative of the more famous Velociraptor, though with a more robust skull. It lived in what is now Canada (including DinosaurProvincialPark in Alberta), and its fossils are found in rocks dating to the Campanian age of the Late Cretaceous, about 75 million years ago. So far the recovered remains have been incomplete, so this rendition is somewhat more speculative than usual, and based on other related species. The dinosaur probably massed comparably to a modern day coyote, though with its large claws and robust jaws it may have been considerably more formidable.

After reading the excellent recent book All Yesterdays (by Conway, Kosemen, Naish and Hartman), I thought it might be good to step away from the typical paleo-art of charging, thrashing, monstrous theropods with mouths agape and roaring, and depict a quieter scene of dromaeosaur daily life.

Some relevant links (speaking of All Yesterdays):

http://johnconway.co/

http://nemo-ramjet.deviantart.com/

http://blogs.scientificamerican.com/tetrapod-zoology/

http://scotthartman.deviantart.com/

If you like Dromaeosaurids, you should definitely also check out Emily Willoughby’s art:

http://ewilloughby.deviantart.com/

Getting better, but I know I have a lot of learning to do, so constructive critiques welcome and appreciated. I may never draw dromaeosaurs again, though – those feathers were a headache. 

I made this using Photoshop CS3 and a Wacom Intuos tablet.

Please do not reproduce without permission.

Diamantinasaurus and Australovenator
Winton Formation megafauna, from the Early Cretaceous of Australia: The titanosaur Diamantinasaurus matildae and allosauroid Australovenator wintonensis.
You can read more about these animals at:www.plosone.org/article/info%3…Please do not copy or reproduce without permission.

Diamantinasaurus and Australovenator

Winton Formation megafauna, from the Early Cretaceous of Australia: The titanosaur Diamantinasaurus matildae and allosauroid Australovenator wintonensis.

You can read more about these animals at:
www.plosone.org/article/info%3…


Please do not copy or reproduce without permission.

An illustration of a swimming theropod of the Early Cretaceous, created for Scott Persons of the University of Alberta to be included in a press package publicizing his new paper describing some interesting toe-claw-only tracks that were discovered in China. The dinosaur in the image is modeled after Sinocalliopteryx, one of the possible animals responsible for making the tracks - given the size and shape of the impressions, they were likely made by a large compsognathid (like Sinocalliopteryx) or a small early tyrannosauroid, swimming along and kicking in a sort of “dino doggy paddle” that left only toe-marks in the substrate. You can read more about it here (note - the link features an earlier version of the image):
http://news.ualberta.ca/newsarticles/2013/april/swimming-dinosaurs-help-researchers-track-evolution

An illustration of a swimming theropod of the Early Cretaceous, created for Scott Persons of the University of Alberta to be included in a press package publicizing his new paper describing some interesting toe-claw-only tracks that were discovered in China. The dinosaur in the image is modeled after Sinocalliopteryx, one of the possible animals responsible for making the tracks - given the size and shape of the impressions, they were likely made by a large compsognathid (like Sinocalliopteryx) or a small early tyrannosauroid, swimming along and kicking in a sort of “dino doggy paddle” that left only toe-marks in the substrate.

You can read more about it here (note - the link features an earlier version of the image):

http://news.ualberta.ca/newsarticles/2013/april/swimming-dinosaurs-help-researchers-track-evolution